Punch Drunk Love

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In non refurbishment related news, I’ve just returned from my first visit to the Toronto International Film Festival. I know that probably looks like a dereliction of duty, given the chaos we’re currently in, but don’t worry I left the place in capable hands.

Toronto seemed like a really groovy place, sadly I didn’t get to see much of it. I sat through 26 films in 6 days. Most people seem horrified at the idea, but for me it was hog heaven. My natural habitat, the inside of a cinema.

Believe me when I tell you, I watched some of these films so you don’t have to and there’s no chance of them ever playing. Sadly the current climate of fear around posting negative comments about studio films prevents me from naming them. They’re watching.

What I can tell you is to look out for a few titles that are so far up our street, they’ve put down an offer on a house in Ridgewood and enrolled the kids at Harlands.

Among that group are The Imitation Game in which Benedict Cumberbatch gives a moving performance as Enigma code breaker Alan Turing ably supported by Keira Knightley and Charles Dance. If it doesn’t quite face up to the way Britain treated Turing, it’s still an affecting and hugely entertaining piece of work.

Another Oscar baiting turn is given by Eddie Redmayne as Professor Stephen Hawking in the very neatly packaged The Theory of Everything. He really does inhabit the part and looks eerily like Hawking all through the picture. Both Theory and Imitation game are 3-4 hankie films, so come prepared.

The really big one for us though is Mr Turner, Mike Leigh’s beautiful rendition of landscape painter JMW Turner. It features a towering, sensitive and utterly convincing central performance by Timothy Spall who was rightly lauded at Cannes, where he picked up the best actor prize. An Oscar nom is a certainty.

Whiplash is great fun , the story of a music student who dreams of becoming one of the great jazz drummers. He encounters the worlds toughest teacher played wonderfully by J.K Simmons and comes to learn you should be careful what you wish for.

Honourable mentions for Nightcrawler, featuring a bug eyed emaciated Jake Gyllenhaal as a sociopathic, ambulance chasing video news gatherer. Foxcatcher is a strange and uncomfortable film with Steve Carell and St Vincent is tremendously entertaining, not least because we get to watch Bill Murray do what Bill Murray does best for 90 minutes.

One of my particular favourites  was Peter Strickland’s latest exercise in 70’s nostalgia The Duke of Burgundy. I can’t see it being a huge commercial hit, but those who seek it out will be rewarded with a unique tale of a testing lesbian relationship set in an unspecified time and an unspecified place that looks like a Silverkrin hairspray commercial from 1974. It’s amazingly entertaining, even if you don’t fully appreciate the references to 70’s European exploitation cinema. It stars Borgen favourite Sidse Babett Knudsen.

All these films should be released over the next 3 or 4 months. Lucky us. So despite lack of tourist based activity, a very successful trip. And we sat next to Adam Sandler in the pub. I didn’t tell him about how his films are banned in my cinema.

Next year I’ll try and hit 30 films, and make an effort to go up the CN Tower.